Reta's Reflections

The Way Up Is Way Down—John 13:1-17

“Actually, there’s a lot going on under the surface of this special Passover meal, but only Jesus and Judas are aware of it. Judas is part of a devilish plot that Jesus strongly suspects, and he realizes this will be his last meal with ‘his own.’ It is ‘during supper’ (v. 2) that he gets up and takes off his outer robe to strip down to the knee-length tunic that characterizes a slave. He ties a towel around his waist, pours water into a washbasin, and starts washing the other men’s feet (13:2-5). This is his last chance to demonstrate the kind of humble caring that members of the family of God need to have for each other.” Continue reading

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Gethsemane in a New Setting—John 12:20-50

“Unlike the Synoptics, however, this fourth Gospel does not describe Jesus as pleading for God to rescue him from death. As we saw in Lesson 25 on the ‘noble shepherd,’ a characteristic of nobility is the voluntary laying down of one’s life for others (John 10:11). In this spirit, Jesus accepts his destiny: ‘It is for this reason that I have come to this hour'(12:27).” Continue reading

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Political Street Theater—John 12:9-19

“Does it matter who came up with the parade idea? Probably not, except that John’s Gospel portrays a logical cause-and-effect. Jesus is already popular among the common people in Jerusalem, and his raising of Lazarus is the final sign of his right to be king in Israel (John 12:18). What better time to show him off than to a city crowded with Passover pilgrims!” Continue reading

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Mary the Anointer—John 12:1-8

“The name ‘Bethany’ means ‘house of affliction’ or ‘house of the poor,’ which had to be outside of Jerusalem for purity reasons. Brian Capper, an Acts scholar, suggests that Martha, Mary, and Lazarus may have had Essene connections and have sponsored a poorhouse close to their home. Perhaps Jesus originally met these siblings through his concern for the poor. If Mary’s ointment was poured out in the presence of poor people who were more used to smelling bad odors, a ‘house filled with the fragrance of the perfume’ (John 12:3) would have been a treat. In their presence, Jesus’s statement would have denoted compassion rather than callousness. Continue reading

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A Tomb with a View—John 11:38-57; 12:9-11

“The miracle of raising the dead is the last and greatest of Jesus’s ‘signs’ in this Gospel. But can it be literally true? In our experience, dead people do not come to life again. And if it did happen, why do the other Gospels omit such a dramatic event?” Continue reading

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A Household of Beloved Disciples—John 11:17-37

“The other unanswered question is how Jesus came to know and love this family. Was he a cousin or other relative? Did the sisters run a hostel for pilgrims coming to worship at Jerusalem, and he stayed with them when he came? Whatever brought them together, it was such a loving, intimate friendship that both sisters felt free to reproach Jesus for not coming sooner. Only these three siblings are known in this Gospel as ‘beloved disciples.’” Continue reading

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An (Un)Fortunate Illness? — John 11:1-16

“Leaving Thelma, I knew I would never see her again in this life. I did not expect Jesus to raise her as he had raised Lazarus. If we are older than 8 or 9, we know that dead persons do not come to life again. What then can we learn from a story about a man pulled out of his grave alive after four days? Is it a story of hope? Or is it only a legend conveniently omitted by the Synoptic Gospels?” Continue reading

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