Reta's Reflections

A Vineyard of Friendship—John 15:1-17

“Agape love, of course, does not have to mean liking another person—it is wanting the best for them as you want the best for yourself. It is taking others on their own terms and accepting them the way they are, understanding that hurtful behavior can come from personal insecurity or even mental illness. It may sometimes mean confrontation and ‘tough love’ that can easily be misinterpreted. Agape love demands a lot of humility. It is not surprising that Jesus called this kind of loving a ‘command’ (v. 17)—something you do rather than something you necessarily feel.” Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Questions and Misunderstandings—John 14:1-31

“The ‘key verse’ in this section is verse 6, which many Christians know by heart: ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.’ Unfortunately, this is often used as a doctrinal statement meant to exclude non-Christians. ‘Unless you believe in Jesus you can’t be saved,’ some will say. Instead of ‘not letting hearts be troubled’ (14:1), this verse has troubled Christian hearts and those from other religions alike. Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Loyalty and Betrayal among Beloved Friends—John 13:18-38

“But in this Gospel, Judas’s action is so reprehensible it is as if the devil himself possessed him (vv. 2, 27). As further evidence, Jesus quotes an apt line from Psalm 41:9—‘Even my bosom friend in whom I trusted, who ate of my bread, has lifted the heel against me.’ (See Jn 13:18.) In that Mediterranean culture, to ‘lift the heel’ means showing the sole of one’s foot to another. It is a great insult, a wish to utterly shame another.” Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Way Up Is Way Down—John 13:1-17

“Actually, there’s a lot going on under the surface of this special Passover meal, but only Jesus and Judas are aware of it. Judas is part of a devilish plot that Jesus strongly suspects, and he realizes this will be his last meal with ‘his own.’ It is ‘during supper’ (v. 2) that he gets up and takes off his outer robe to strip down to the knee-length tunic that characterizes a slave. He ties a towel around his waist, pours water into a washbasin, and starts washing the other men’s feet (13:2-5). This is his last chance to demonstrate the kind of humble caring that members of the family of God need to have for each other.” Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gethsemane in a New Setting—John 12:20-50

“Unlike the Synoptics, however, this fourth Gospel does not describe Jesus as pleading for God to rescue him from death. As we saw in Lesson 25 on the ‘noble shepherd,’ a characteristic of nobility is the voluntary laying down of one’s life for others (John 10:11). In this spirit, Jesus accepts his destiny: ‘It is for this reason that I have come to this hour'(12:27).” Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Political Street Theater—John 12:9-19

“Does it matter who came up with the parade idea? Probably not, except that John’s Gospel portrays a logical cause-and-effect. Jesus is already popular among the common people in Jerusalem, and his raising of Lazarus is the final sign of his right to be king in Israel (John 12:18). What better time to show him off than to a city crowded with Passover pilgrims!” Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Mary the Anointer—John 12:1-8

“The name ‘Bethany’ means ‘house of affliction’ or ‘house of the poor,’ which had to be outside of Jerusalem for purity reasons. Brian Capper, an Acts scholar, suggests that Martha, Mary, and Lazarus may have had Essene connections and have sponsored a poorhouse close to their home. Perhaps Jesus originally met these siblings through his concern for the poor. If Mary’s ointment was poured out in the presence of poor people who were more used to smelling bad odors, a ‘house filled with the fragrance of the perfume’ (John 12:3) would have been a treat. In their presence, Jesus’s statement would have denoted compassion rather than callousness. Continue reading

Posted in Bible Study | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment